Aztec Warrior

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Aztec Warrior

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Aztec Warrior Video

History's Deadliest Weapons - The Macuahuitl - Man At Arms: Art of War

It would be much later in the mid 13th century when the Aztec people hit their stride, and the Aztec warriors would fight and go to war for their society.

The Aztec people were very war focused. It was important for them to go to war to not only expand and ensure the success of their empire, but also to capture prisoners of war.

These prisoners of war would often be used as sacrifices in one of their many religious practises that defined the Aztec peoples. The Aztec were highly militarized and it was an important part of their life.

They had multiple rankings and orders that were earned and achieved by each individual Aztec. The Aztec military had in essence traditional military style rankings, but they also added additional elements, rankings and orders that an Aztec warrior could achieve or gain membership too.

To achieve these rankings, or to join the orders required feats of bravery, skill and talent in battle. The primary foundation of these feats would be the capturing of sacrificial victims, which was hugely important to the Aztec people and their religious beliefs and practises.

For the Aztec warriors the ability to transcend their born status was truly possible, even commoners had the ability to achieve and move through the many rankings and order employed by the Aztec military.

The Aztec people were not metal forgers, this in turn affected the type of weaponry they built and used. Without iron, the commonly found metals were typically not suitable for blade construction, so the Aztecs used a local volcanic rock called Obsidian to create sharp edges.

These rock blades would be attached to wooden batons, creating a sword of sorts known to the Aztecs as the Macuahuitl. The Aztecs also employed plenty of other weaponry on the battlefield too, slings, spears, bows and arrows and clubs and maces were all common place.

The warriors of the ancient Aztec people, wore suitable armour for their environment. Light but protective cotton vests known as ichcahuipilli would offer the basic protection for all warriors, with war suits known as the tlahuiztli being used by the higher ranking warriors.

Shields were a must have also, for deflecting blows and protecting a warrior from projectile attacks.

For the very elite warriors helmets were common, often fashioned from wood into a revered animal visage, these helmets were protective and useful for provoking fear into the Aztecs foes.

Increase damage to 1d6 at 11th level. At 15th level, you can attack three times per turn when you take the Attack action on your turn.

As a Bonus Action, can go into a blood frenzy for Wisdom Modifier number of rounds. While blood frenzying, you have advantage on all melee attacks.

When the blood frenzy is over, you have one level of exhaustion. You can use this feature once per day. A stealthy scout.

Patron deity is Quetzalcoatl, Habbakuk, Chislev, or and deity associated with birds esp. At 1st level, you gain proficiency in the Stealth skill.

At 1st level, if you hit a creature that has not spotted you or is focused on an ally within 5ft of it, you deal an extra 1d6 damage against that creature on your first hit of the round.

This damage increases by 1d6 at 9th and 17th levels. Can use bonus action to Hide or Disengage. At 2nd level, your speed increases by 10ft. You have a darkvision of 60ft.

If you already have darkvision, the distance doubles. At 6th level, the feathers on your helmet hum with magical power. You can spend two feathers to cast Darkness , Silence , or Pass without Trace Self Target only as an action or Feather Fall as a reaction for one feather.

You have your Aztec Warrior level number of feathers. You regain the feathers after a long rest. Spellcasting modifier is Wisdom.

At 15th level, you can cast Fly on yourself by spending 4 feathers, but your speed is ft. A big, scary tank with death powers.

Patron deity is Xipe Totec, Myrkul, Nerull, or any deity associated with life-death-rebirth cycles or just death. At 1st level, you gain proficiency in the Intimidation skill.

At 1st level, as an Action, you can try to scare one creature you can see within 30 ft. To do so, you must succeed an Intimidation check contested by the target's Wisdom saving throw.

If you are rolling for height and weight, add one foot to your height and 50 lbs to your weight. At 2nd level, you can make a shield bash attack as a Bonus Action.

When you pick you Fighting Style, you can choose this option:. When a creature you can see attacks a target other than you that is within 5 feet of you, you can use your reaction to impose disadvantage on the attack roll.

You must be wielding a shield. At 6th level, you learn the Spare the Dying cantrip. You can also cast Speak with the Dead and Gentle Repose as rituals.

At 11th level, you can cast Raise Dead as a ritual if you have the necessary components. At 15th level, if you get the killing blow on a small or medium creature, but do not use the Sacrifice to the Gods feature, you can use your bonus action to resurrect them as a ghoul under your control.

You can give them instructions telepathically or verbally. It rolls its own initiative. Lasts an hour or until end of combat, whichever is shorter. To qualify for multiclassing into the Aztec Warrior class, you must meet these prerequisites: 13 in two of the following Ability Scores: Strength, Dexterity, or Constitution.

When you multiclass into the Aztec Warrior class, you gain the following proficiencies: Padded Armor, Simple and Martial weapons except those detailed in the class description.

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Warriors were essential to Aztec life and culture. At birth, an Aztec boy would receive two symbols of being a warrior.

A shield would be placed in his left hand, and an arrow would be placed in his right. After a short ceremony the newly born boy's umbilical cord, shield, and arrow would be taken to a battlefield to be buried by a renowned warrior.

These parts would symbolize the rise of a warrior. Each shield and arrow would be made specifically for that boy and would resemble his family and the gods.

These birth rituals show the importance of warrior culture to the Aztecs. As for girls, at birth their umbilical cord would be buried usually under the family fireplace, representing the woman's future life to be in the home taking care of household needs.

Since all boys starting at age 15 were trained to become warriors Aztec society as a whole had no standing army. Therefore, warriors would be drafted to a campaign through a Tequital a payment of goods and labor enforced by the government.

Outside of battle, many warriors were farmers and tradesmen. They would learn their trade from their father. Warriors would be married by their early twenties and would be a vital part of Aztec daily life.

They would work a certain trade usually passed on through family status. Warriors would be lower class citizens, that when called upon would engage in battle.

Being a warrior did, however, present a way to move up in Aztec society. The warrior's life was a chance to change one's social status.

If they reached the rank of Eagle or Jaguar warrior they would be considered as nobles. They would also become full-time warriors working for the city-state to protect merchants and the city itself.

They resembled the police force of Aztec society. Aztec culture valued appearance, and appearance defined people within society.

Warriors had a very distinct appearance. Their dress would be in relation to their success, and triumph on the battlefield.

Gaining ranks as an Aztec warrior was based on how many enemy soldiers that warrior had captured. A warrior who had taken one captive would carry a macuahuitl , and a chimalli without any decorations.

He would also be rewarded with a manta, and an orange cape with a stripe, a carmine-colored loincloth, and a scorpion-knotted designed cape.

Daily, A two captive warrior would be able to wear sandals on the battlefield. He would also have a feathered warrior suit and a cone shaped cap.

The feathered suit and the cone shaped cap appearance are the most common within the Codex Mendoza. A four captive warrior, which would be an eagle or jaguar warrior, would wear an actual jaguar skin over his body with an open slot for the head.

These warriors would have expensive jewelry and weapons. Their hair style was also unique to their status. The hair would sit at the top of their head and be parted into two sections with a red cord wrapped around it.

The red cord would also have an ornament of green, blue, and red feathers. The shields were made of wicker wood and leather, so very few survived.

The Aztecs didn't normally maintain tight territorial control within their empire but nonetheless there are examples of fortifications built by the Aztecs.

The latter is where Ahuitzotl built garrisons and fortifications to keep watch over the Matlatzinca , Mazahua and Otomies and to always have troops close to the enemy Tarascan state - the borders with which were also guarded and at least partly fortified on both sides.

The Aztec army was organized into two groups. The nobles were organized into professional warrior societies. The Tlacochcalcatl and Tlacateccatl also had to name successors prior to any battle so that if they died they could be immediately replaced.

Priests also took part in warfare, carrying the effigies of deities into battle alongside the armies. The army also had boys about the age of twelve along with them serving as porters and messengers; this was mainly for training measures.

The adjacent image shows the Tlacateccatl and the Tlacochcalcatl and two other officers probably priests known as Huitznahuatl and Ticocyahuacatl , all dressed in their tlahuiztli suits.

The formal education of the Aztecs was to train and teach young boys how to function in their society, particularly as warriors.

The Aztecs had a relatively small standing army. Only the elite soldiers part of the societies such as the Jaguar Knights and the soldiers stationed at the few Aztec fortifications were full-time.

Nevertheless, every boy was trained to become a warrior with the exception of nobles. Trades such as farming and artisan skills were not taught at the two formal schools.

All boys who were between the ages of ten and twenty years old would attend one of the two schools: the Telpochcalli or the neighborhood school for commoners, and the Calmecac which was the exclusive school for nobles.

At the Telpochcalli, students would learn the art of warfare, and would become warriors. At the Calmecac students would be trained to become military leaders, priests, government officials, etc.

Once a boy reached the age of ten, a section of hair on the back of his head was grown long to indicate that he had not yet taken captives in war.

At age fifteen, the father of the boy handed the responsibility of training to the telpochcalli, who would then train the boy to become a warrior.

The telpochcalli was accountable for the training of approximately to youths between the ages of fifteen and twenty years old. The youth were tested to determine how fit they would be for battle by accompanying their leaders on campaigns as shield-bearers.

War captains and veteran warriors had the role of training the boys how to handle their weapons. This generally included showing them how to hold a shield, how to hold a sword, how to shoot arrows from a bow and how to throw darts with an atlatl.

The calmecac were attached to temples as a dedication to patron gods. For example, the calmecac in the main ceremonial complex of Tenochtitlan was dedicated to the god Quetzalcoatl.

Although there is uncertainty about the exact ages that boys entered into the calmecac, according to evidence that recorded the king's sons entering at the age of five and sons of other nobles entering between the ages of six and thirteen, it seems that youth began their training here at a younger age than those in the telpochcalli did.

When formal training in handling weapons began at age fifteen, youth would begin to accompany the seasoned warriors on campaigns so that they could become accustomed to military life and lose the fear of battle.

At age twenty, those who wanted to become warriors officially went to war. The parents of the youth sought out veteran warriors, bringing them foods and gifts with the objective of securing a warrior to be the sponsor of their child.

Ideally, the sponsor would watch over the youth and teach him how to take captives. However, the degree to which the warrior looked after and helped the noble's child depended greatly on the amount of payment received from the parents.

Thus, sons of high nobility tended to succeed more often in war than those of lower nobility. However, while parallels can be drawn between the organization of Aztec and Western military systems, as each developed from similar functional necessities, the differences between the two are far greater than the similarities.

The members of the Aztec army had loyalties to many different people and institutions, and ranking was not based solely on the position one held in a centralized military hierarchy.

Thus, the classification of ranks and statuses cannot be defined in the same manner as that of the modern Western military.

Next were the commoners yaoquizqueh. And finally, there were commoners who had taken captives, the so-called tlamanih. Ranking above these came the nobles of the "warrior societies".

These tlahuiztli became gradually more spectacular as the ranks progressed, allowing the most excellent warriors who had taken many captives to stand out on the battlefield.

The higher ranked warriors were also called "Pipiltin". Commoners excelling in warfare could be promoted to the noble class and could enter some of the warrior societies at least the Eagles and Jaguars.

Sons of nobles trained at the Calmecac, however, were expected to enter into one of the societies as they progressed through the ranks. Warriors could shift from one society and into another when they became sufficiently proficient; exactly how this happened is uncertain.

Each society had different styles of dress and equipment as well as styles of body paint and adornments.

Tlamanih captor was a term that described commoners who had taken captives within the Aztec army, particularly those who had taken one captive.

Two captive warriors, recognizable by their red and black tlahuiztli and conical hats. Papalotl lit. Those Aztec warriors who demonstrated the most bravery and who fought well became either jaguar or eagle warriors.

Of all of the Aztec warriors, they were the most feared. Both the jaguar and eagle Aztec warriors wore distinguishing helmets and uniforms.

The jaguars were identifiable by the jaguar skins they wore over their entire body, with only their faces showing from within the jaguar head. The eagle Aztec warriors, on the other hand, wore feathered helmets including an open beak.

This mix of two types of rankings in essence gave growth for the natural leaders and the Aztecs who preferred to work at grass roots levels on the battlefield.

A picture from the Codex Mendoza depicting the progression of an Aztec warrior as they grow in stature based on their captives from battle.

It was common for these positions to be held by nobles who were afforded much more opportunity for the upper echelon of positions than the Aztec commoners.

It was also common that some of the high ranking military officers in the Aztec military were priests also.

A good example of this is the Tlacochcalcatl, known as the Keeper of the house of darts who was a general rank. When the Aztec youths starting training on the battlefield or in war, they were classified into certain ranks.

As they progressed and proved their worth they would be able to become a youth master and later a full time warrior, once they reached manhood or made their first captive.

Commoners were used in the Aztec military, to assist in battle, and to carry supplies and weapons for the rest of the troops.

The Aztec people were not metal forgers, this in turn affected the type of weaponry they built and used. Without iron, the commonly found metals were typically not suitable for blade construction, so the Aztecs used a local volcanic rock called Obsidian to create sharp edges.

These rock blades would be attached to wooden batons, creating a sword of sorts known to the Aztecs as the Macuahuitl. The Aztecs also employed plenty of other weaponry on the battlefield too, slings, spears, bows and arrows and clubs and maces were all common place.

The warriors of the ancient Aztec people, wore suitable armour for their environment. Light but protective cotton vests known as ichcahuipilli would offer the basic protection for all warriors, with war suits known as the tlahuiztli being used by the higher ranking warriors.

Shields were a must have also, for deflecting blows and protecting a warrior from projectile attacks. For the very elite warriors helmets were common, often fashioned from wood into a revered animal visage, these helmets were protective and useful for provoking fear into the Aztecs foes.

Not only were the priests an integral part of Aztec society, performing religious rituals, ceremonies and helping in government matters, they were also fine warriors.

The Aztec warrior priests shared many traits with the traditional warriors of the Aztec army. Both had the opportunity for progression through sacrificial captures of enemies, and both were adept at swinging a Macuahuitl with intent.

Some of the most revered warriors in the times of the ancient Aztecs, the Eagle and Jaguar warriors were also some of the most elite and battle ready warriors in the Aztec army.

To gain order to this high status order of warriors, a feat of great bravery would be required, and the ability to capture numerous sacrifices in continuous battles.

Only the best warriors were allowed into this order, but once there they would reap the benefits, Eagle and Jaguar warriors were afforded many perks in Aztec society.

The only warriors in Aztec society that were more revered than the jaguar and eagle warriors were the elite classes of the shorn ones and the otamies.

The shorn ones were the pinnacle of the Aztec warrior classes, but joining was not possible for everyone. Brave feats and many captives would be required to join, and likely to join meant you were already a member of the otamies, the rank just below the might shorn ones.

Brutal and fearsome, with highly decorative outfits, battles in Mesoamerica were likely colourful affairs when the Aztec warriors were involved.

You are now proficient in Constitution Saving Throws. At 9th level, your deity blesses your weapon. Chose one melee weapon to bless.

This weapon counts as magical for determining resistance and vulnerability. You now know its location if you are on the same plane as your weapon.

To bless a new weapon, you need to conduct the ritual for an hour and spend 30 gp on offerings.

Only one weapon can be blessed at a time. At 10th level, you can channel your patron's power into your blade. When you attack a creature with your Blessed Weapon, you can choose to have that weapon do a different damage type based on your Warrior Society but before the actual attack hits.

At 13th level, you can further channel you deity's power into you. Once per day, you can cast a spell at 4th level based on your Warrior Society.

The Spellcasting Modifier for these spells are Wisdom. At 17th level, the spell's level is increased to 5th and at 20th level, you can cast that spell twice per day at 6th spell level.

At 14th level, your reflexes are as sharp as your blade. You have advantage on Dexterity saving throws against effects that you can see, such as traps and spells.

To gain this benefit, you can't be blinded, deafened, or incapacitated. At 18th level, you can let out a might battle cry.

As a Bonus Action, you make a battle cry with a range of 60ft. The effect it different for each Warrior Society. You can use this feature once per short rest.

All allies have advantage to their next weapon or spell attack rolls. If they do not use this feature within one minute, the advantage is lost.

Can be used while Invisible. Deafened enemies do not know where you are when you use this feature. Any enemy affected by this yell can make the saving throw again at the end of their turn to remove this condition.

All affected targets must use their reactions to move as far away from you as possible. At 20th level, you can become an avatar of your god's fury.

As a Bonus Action, you can merge with your helmet to gain abilities based on your Warrior Society. This transformation does not interfere with holding items or spell casting.

You can revert back as a Bonus Action or become unconscious. You gain a jaguar head and claws. Your Base Strength increases to Both these attacks have Deep Wounds and Jaguar Strength applied to them.

You have an eagle's head, feathers sprouting from your arms, and talons. Your base Dexterity is Your sight increases to 10 times the normal vision.

Your darkvision is now like what you would see normally in daylight. You have Feather Fall on you at all times. Your talons are 1d4 finesse weapons, which you can make one attack as a bonus action.

You have bone growths emerge from you. Your base Constitution becomes You have advantage to all intimidate checks.

Battlefield intimidation rolls are at disadvantage. A two-handed weapon berserker. Patron deity is Tezcatlipoca or any god associated with cats especially big cats.

At 1st level, you gain proficiency in the Athletics skill. If you are already proficient in this skill, you can double your proficiency.

At 6th level, when you hit with a melee weapon, it cause bleed damage. The target with bleed takes 1d4 bleeding damage at the beginning of their every turn for 30 seconds 5 rounds.

Any enemy affected by Deep Wounds can make the saving throw again at the end of their turn to remove it.

Aztec Warrior Video

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